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Performing Viral Pandemics?

Started by aha. Last reply by aha May 11. 2 Replies

Hi.Hopefully all is well!The shorty is a suggestion to start an online conversation group to elaborate questions from theCovid-19 oriented period and Performance Philosophy?eg. Intra-Active Virome?…Continue

We all have the same dream?

Started by Egemen Kalyon Apr 2. 0 Replies

Hello, "We all have the same dream" is my project that aims to create an archive from the dreams of our era and reinterpret Jung's "collective unconscious" concepts with performance and performing…Continue

Circus and Its Others 2020, UC Davis CFP

Started by Ante Ursic Mar 15. 0 Replies

Circus and its Others 2020November 12-15University of California, DavisRevised Proposal Deadline: April 15, 2020Launched in 2014, the Circus and its Others research project explores the ways in which…Continue

Tags: critical, ethnic, queer, performance, animal

Blog Posts

"Further Evidence on the Meaning of Musical Performance" Working Paper

Posted by Phillip Cartwright on January 15, 2020 at 21:28 0 Comments

Karolina Nevoina and I are pleased to announce availability of our working paper, "Further Evidence on the Meaning of Musical Performance". Special thanks to Professor Aaron Williamon and the Royal College of Music, Centre for Performance Science.…

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Division of Labor - Denis Beaubois

Posted by Gabrielle Senza on February 23, 2018 at 0:36 0 Comments

I just came across Denis Beaubois, an Australian multidisciplinary artist whose work, Currency - Division of Labor might be of interest to researchers here.

It is a series of video/performance works that use the division of labor model in capitalism as a structural tool for performance.

From his website:

The Division of labour work explores…

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Videos

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CFP: “The Arts of Logistics” Call for Papers

Proposals due 22 Feburary

Queen Mary University of London

3-4 June 2016

Keynote Presentations: Deborah Cowen (University of Toronto) and Alberto Toscano (Goldsmiths, University of London)

The so-called “logistics revolution” and its attendant technologies have made possible capitalism’s reproduction and restructuring over the past half century. Among other things, logistics sped up the loading and unloading of ships and helped establish the “global factory,” thereby drastically reducing the labor time required to produce and circulate commodities. This allowed capitalism to expand its economies of scale and relocate manufacturing to wherever worker militancy and the costs of labor were lowest. While the logistics infrastructure has transformed social life the world over, it also has opened up new opportunities for resistance to exploitation. Since the onset of the financial crisis, an array of movements internationally have turned to logistics as a terrain of political struggle, from the work slowdowns of logistics employees to the port and highway blockades of social movements as various as Occupy, the “Boycott, Divest, and Sanction” campaign, and BlackLivesMatter. Logistics is also increasingly material for art, from representations of global trade in photography and literature to the use of actual shipping containers as performance spaces and pop-up galleries.

“The Arts of Logistics” brings together scholars, activists, and artists from across the humanities and social sciences to interrogate how social movements and the arts respond to a world remade by logistics. Long an important topic for economists, management theorists, and sociologists, logistics is only recently emerging as an object of substantive study by artists and researchers in the humanities. Thus, this conference seeks to further define scholarly, political, and artistic conversations on the nexus of political economy, anti-capitalist struggle, and art. Possible topics participants could engage include the following:

-The politics and aesthetics of mapping logistics or infrastructure

-Container art and architecture

-Historical representations of empire, trade, and commodity flows

-The emergence of counter-logistics as an anti-capitalist strategy

-Cultures of surveillance and security

-Labour and consumer activism around the “global factory”

-Data and network visualisation

-Queering logistics

We invite proposals for 20-minute papers in a variety of formats. As an interdisciplinary conference, we also welcome practical demonstrations by artists, performances lectures, roundtables, and more.

Please submit an abstract of 300 words (max) and a short bio of 50 words (max) to both conference organisers: Shane Boyle (m.s.boyle@qmul.ac.uk) and Aylwyn Walsh (awalsh@lincoln.ac.uk) by February 22. Please make sure to include your preferred contact information and specify ‘The Arts of Logistics’ in your subject line. If you are interested in making a proposal that involves multiple contributions or lasts longer than 20 minutes (like a roundtable or screening) please be in touch with the organisers as soon as possible.

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