Performance Philosophy is an international network open to all researchers concerned with the relationship between performance & philosophy.

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Forum

What does the structureless of shock look like?

Started by Jim Daly. Last reply by Bernard Roddy Feb 22. 1 Reply

You can't impose structure on shock, can you? Continue

Bishop and Bourriaud

Started by Bernard Roddy. Last reply by Monica Gontovnik Aug 19, 2016. 1 Reply

Claire Bishop's book, Artificial Hells, provides a useful resource to engage with a set of works in performance of relevance to studio practice today. I am uploading my notes on the the first pages…Continue

Claire Bishop and Nicholas Bourriaud

Started by Bernard Roddy Jul 26, 2016. 0 Replies

Claire Bishop's book, Artificial Hells, provides a useful resource to engage with a set of works in performance of relevance to studio practice today. I am uploading my notes on the the first pages…Continue

Tags: aesthetics, relational, criticism, art, performance

Nowhere Near London (or, The Late Walter Benjamin)

Started by Fred Dalmasso Jun 23, 2016. 0 Replies

is to be given its premiere in the main auditorium at theWatford Palace Theatre on Monday, July 4th, 7.30pmsee …Continue

Blog Posts

THE OBJECT TURNED INSIDE OUT

Posted by Allen Alain Viguier on June 16, 2017 at 17:36 0 Comments

Object art is entirely processual and performative. No object preexists a perspective, a context and a participant-observer. The object post-object was not has been turned on its head, and turned inside out. A site dedicated to second order observation.…

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Notes on Performance art, the Body and the Political.pdf

Posted by Andrea Pagnes (VestAndPage) on March 12, 2017 at 15:54 0 Comments

For anyone interested, I have linked on my page profile at the voice 'texts' my curatorial and post event catalogue text of the 2nd Live art exhibition project Venice International Performance Art Week: Ritual Body-Political Body (Venice, 2014).

DAAD Faculty Summer Seminar on Performance Theory/Performance Practice

Posted by David J Levin on February 20, 2017 at 21:17 0 Comments

Hi All, a quick note to remind everyone that applications for the DAAD Faculty Summer Seminar on Performance Theory & Performance Practice to be held on the campus of the University of Chicago are due March 1. The seminar, organized in cooperation with the Chicago Performance Lab, will take place from June 19, 2017-July 15, 2017. Information on stipends & applications can be found …

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Experimental Residency Programs for Artists & Academics (Spring/Summer 2017)

Posted by Aaron Finbloom on February 7, 2017 at 16:46 0 Comments

The School of Making Thinking hosts a summer residency program for qualified artists and thinkers to work alongside each other for one to three week sessions. We continually experiment with structure, approaches to programming, and alternative pedagogies. Our residents have included sound and performance artists, poets, philosophers, painters, botanists, dancers, playwrights, filmmakers, video artists, documentarians, and historians, among other diverse practices.
Applications…
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CFP: “The Arts of Logistics” Call for Papers

Proposals due 22 Feburary

Queen Mary University of London

3-4 June 2016

Keynote Presentations: Deborah Cowen (University of Toronto) and Alberto Toscano (Goldsmiths, University of London)

The so-called “logistics revolution” and its attendant technologies have made possible capitalism’s reproduction and restructuring over the past half century. Among other things, logistics sped up the loading and unloading of ships and helped establish the “global factory,” thereby drastically reducing the labor time required to produce and circulate commodities. This allowed capitalism to expand its economies of scale and relocate manufacturing to wherever worker militancy and the costs of labor were lowest. While the logistics infrastructure has transformed social life the world over, it also has opened up new opportunities for resistance to exploitation. Since the onset of the financial crisis, an array of movements internationally have turned to logistics as a terrain of political struggle, from the work slowdowns of logistics employees to the port and highway blockades of social movements as various as Occupy, the “Boycott, Divest, and Sanction” campaign, and BlackLivesMatter. Logistics is also increasingly material for art, from representations of global trade in photography and literature to the use of actual shipping containers as performance spaces and pop-up galleries.

“The Arts of Logistics” brings together scholars, activists, and artists from across the humanities and social sciences to interrogate how social movements and the arts respond to a world remade by logistics. Long an important topic for economists, management theorists, and sociologists, logistics is only recently emerging as an object of substantive study by artists and researchers in the humanities. Thus, this conference seeks to further define scholarly, political, and artistic conversations on the nexus of political economy, anti-capitalist struggle, and art. Possible topics participants could engage include the following:

-The politics and aesthetics of mapping logistics or infrastructure

-Container art and architecture

-Historical representations of empire, trade, and commodity flows

-The emergence of counter-logistics as an anti-capitalist strategy

-Cultures of surveillance and security

-Labour and consumer activism around the “global factory”

-Data and network visualisation

-Queering logistics

We invite proposals for 20-minute papers in a variety of formats. As an interdisciplinary conference, we also welcome practical demonstrations by artists, performances lectures, roundtables, and more.

Please submit an abstract of 300 words (max) and a short bio of 50 words (max) to both conference organisers: Shane Boyle (m.s.boyle@qmul.ac.uk) and Aylwyn Walsh (awalsh@lincoln.ac.uk) by February 22. Please make sure to include your preferred contact information and specify ‘The Arts of Logistics’ in your subject line. If you are interested in making a proposal that involves multiple contributions or lasts longer than 20 minutes (like a roundtable or screening) please be in touch with the organisers as soon as possible.

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