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Performing Viral Pandemics?

Started by aha. Last reply by aha May 11. 2 Replies

Hi.Hopefully all is well!The shorty is a suggestion to start an online conversation group to elaborate questions from theCovid-19 oriented period and Performance Philosophy?eg. Intra-Active Virome?…Continue

We all have the same dream?

Started by Egemen Kalyon Apr 2. 0 Replies

Hello, "We all have the same dream" is my project that aims to create an archive from the dreams of our era and reinterpret Jung's "collective unconscious" concepts with performance and performing…Continue

Circus and Its Others 2020, UC Davis CFP

Started by Ante Ursic Mar 15. 0 Replies

Circus and its Others 2020November 12-15University of California, DavisRevised Proposal Deadline: April 15, 2020Launched in 2014, the Circus and its Others research project explores the ways in which…Continue

Tags: critical, ethnic, queer, performance, animal

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"Further Evidence on the Meaning of Musical Performance" Working Paper

Posted by Phillip Cartwright on January 15, 2020 at 21:28 0 Comments

Karolina Nevoina and I are pleased to announce availability of our working paper, "Further Evidence on the Meaning of Musical Performance". Special thanks to Professor Aaron Williamon and the Royal College of Music, Centre for Performance Science.…

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Division of Labor - Denis Beaubois

Posted by Gabrielle Senza on February 23, 2018 at 0:36 0 Comments

I just came across Denis Beaubois, an Australian multidisciplinary artist whose work, Currency - Division of Labor might be of interest to researchers here.

It is a series of video/performance works that use the division of labor model in capitalism as a structural tool for performance.

From his website:

The Division of labour work explores…

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Stages of Utopia and Dissent - 50 Years On

Event Details

Stages of Utopia and Dissent - 50 Years On

Time: May 19, 2018 all day
Location: Loughborough University London
Street: Queen Elizabeth Park, site of the 2012 Olympics
City/Town: Stratford, East London
Website or Map: http://www.lboro.ac.uk/aed/st…
Phone: +44 (0)1509 223071
Event Type: conference
Organized By: Fred Dalmasso
Latest Activity: Feb 12, 2018

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Event Description

Final_abstract-may-symposium.pdf15th May 1968: the Odeon theatre in Paris is occupied by students and becomes the insurgent headquarters where every night militants recount the days' action in occupied factories to an audience of people camping in the auditorium. 15th June 1968: the Odeon theatre is cleared by the CRS forces, nothing remains but one banderole “solidarité avec les tra­vailleurs en lutte” symbolising the general strike voted in May by theatre practitioners in solidarity with the workers’ struggle. While the May revolt did not radically change workers’ conditions, it perennially inscribed some of the boldness and inventiveness of the 1960s in performing arts upon the French stage: a theatre of bodies rebelling against the established order and inviting the audience to be involved as creative participants and not as mere consumers anymore. The same spirit led to the creation, a year later, of the Centre universitaire expérimental de Vincennes, where students could create their own individualised cross-disciplinary curriculum and were taught by thinkers such as Gilles Deleuze, Jean-François Lyotard, Michel Foucault, Alain Badiou or Hélène Cixous. There were other students protesting against wars or fundamental liberties in other parts of the world at the time, but youth rebellion was never as mythologised as that of the French students’ fight against institutional oppression.

The effects were felt across the Channel, too – but the nature of those effects was, and remains, disputed. It certainly galvanised the growth of a theatrical counter-culture which encompassed agit-prop and T-i-E, community theatre and performance art, childrens’ theatre and the avant-garde. For some, like Catherine Itzin May 1968 was the high point of “a historic year which … clearly marked the end of an era in a historically unprecedented fashion and the beginning of a period of equally unprecedented political consciousness and activism.” Howard Brenton saw it rather differently and much less positively: “May 1968 was crucial…” he said. “[It] disinherited my generation in two ways. First it destroyed any remaining affection for official culture… But it also, secondly, destroyed the notions of personal freedom, anarchist political action. And it failed. It was defeated. A generation dreaming of a beautiful utopia was kicked – kicked awake and not dead. I’ve got to believe not kicked dead. May 68 gave me a desperation I still have.”

50 years on… where are we? What remains of the dream of a possible union of students and workers in protest? What remains of autogestion and emancipatory education? What remains of theatre inventiveness and sedition? What remains of a need for participatory audiences? What remains of utopia and dissent?


We invite theatre and performance scholars/artists and other scholars/practitioners with an interest in theatre, performance and politics to contribute in the form of ten-minute provocations, twenty-minute papers or twenty-minute scratch performances.

Please email all abstracts (no more than 300 words in length), an additional few sentences of biographical information and precise details of the audio-visual technology you will need to make your presentation to Dr Fred Dalmasso – f.t.j.dalmasso@lboro.ac.uk and Prof. Mick Mangan - M.Mangan@lboro.ac.uk The deadline for the submission of proposals is Wednesday 28 February 2018.

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